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English Language Learners (ELL)

                                                     

 

    Our Mission

The ELL Program will educate all English Language Learners for lifelong success in an academically challenging, safe, and nurturing environment that respects and builds upon the unique cultural and linguistic attributes they bring to the learning community.

Our Vision

The ELL Program advocates and partners in student achievement; we recognize that all stakeholders (students, parents, educators, community members, etc.) share the responsibility of ensuring that English Language Learners develop linguistic, cognitive, and academic skills to become competitive citizens of our society.

Goals

The Goddard USD 265 English Language Learner (ELL) program assists students whose first language at home is not English or use another language other than English in the home. Students are supported in language development, particularly in listening and reading comprehension, and language production - speaking and writing.

Goddard USD 265 has three full-time ELL Specialists; Marti Campbell, Sarah Hensley and Judi McAnally. Their goal is to support teachers and ELL students.

The program is developed to help ELL’s:

1. Develop reading skills. Give language learners many opportunities to read and write in meaningful contexts, in their first and second languages. Draw on effective strategies for increasing literacy skills. Integrate technology to support writing instruction and motivate students to use written language to communicate. Encourage students to develop literacy skills in their native language, and then transfer these skills to learning English.

2.  Work from strengths. Build on what students already know. Draw on their background experiences and encourage connections between academic concepts and students' own lives. Help students see the value of being able to communicate in multiple languages.

3. Connect with students' families and culture. Use culturally congruent teaching methods. Incorporate culture and native language, introduce multicultural literature, and draw on the expertise of community members. Give ELL students opportunities to teach others about their first language and home culture.

4. Use engaging instruction. Use effective strategies such as project-based learning, thematic instruction, and cooperative grouping to engage learners. Give students opportunities to talk about shared learning experiences. Hands-on, experiential learning experiences will develop understanding. Help ELL students connect words with meaning by using nonverbal clues and nonlinguistic representation of ideas, including multimedia, manipulatives, simulations, and modeling.

5. Vary assessment strategies. Use wide-ranging assessments, including observations, portfolios, and performance assessments.

        Objectives

  • Construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and informational text through grade-appropriate listing, reading, and viewing
  • Participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of information, ideas, and analyses, reponding to peer, audience, or reader comments and questions.
  • Speak and write about grade-appropriate complex literary and informational texts and topics.
  • Construct grade-appropriate oral and written claims and support them with reasoning and evidence.
  • Conduct research and evaluate and communicate findings to answer questions or solve problems.
  • Analyze and critique the arguments of others orally and in writing.
  • Adapt language choices to purpose, task, and audience when speaking and writing.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases in oral presentations and literary and informational text.
  • Create clear and coherent grade=appropriate speech and text.
  • Make accurate use of standard English to communicate in grade-appropriate speech and writing.

        

           Action Plans

Our plan of action is to follow the state English Language Proficency standards as described in the ELP standards introduction “The 10 ELP Standards are designed for collaborative use by English as a second language (ESL)/English language development (ELD) and content area teachers in both English language development and content-area instruction. Explicit recognition that language acquisition takes place across the content areas fosters collaboration among educators and benefits ELLs’ learning experiences” (KSDE 2014, p. 4). (The next two pages are taken from KSDE ELP State Standards, April 2014   http://www.ksde.org/Default.aspx?tabid=459)

 

Organization of the Standards -

For the purposes of clarity, the 10 ELP Standards are organized according to a schema that represents each standard’s importance to ELLs’ participation in the practices called for by college-and-career-ready ELA & Literacy, mathematics, and science standards (G. Bunch, personal communication, August 15, 2013; Bunch, Kibler, & Pimentel, 2013).

 

The ELP Standards are interrelated and can be used separately or in combination. (In particular, as shown above, Standards 810 support the other seven standards.) The standards do not include curriculum statements, nor do they privilege a single approach to the teaching of social and expressive communication or the teaching of grammar; instead, the standards and descriptors for each proficiency level leave room for teachers, curriculum developers, and states to determine how each ELP Standard and descriptor should be reached and what additional topics should be addressed.

 

Alternate Organization of the ELP Standards

 

The ELP Standards might also be framed in relation to narrower domains of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and also in relation to broader receptive,2 productive, and interactive modalities. The interactive modalities category allows for emphasis on the need for ELLs to meaningfully engage with their peers during content area instruction. (Standards 9 and 10 address the linguistic structures of English and are framed in relation to the CCSS for ELA Language domain.)

 

Modalities

Domains

Corresponding ELP Standards

Receptive3 modalities: This mode refers to the learner as a reader or

listener/viewer working with text’ whose author or deliverer is not present or accessible. It presumes that the interaction is with authentic written or oral documents where language input is meaningful and content laden. The learner brings background knowledge, experience, and appropriate interpretive strategies to the task to promote understanding of language and content in order to develop a personal reaction. (Phillips, 2008, p. 96)

 

 

 

Listening and Reading

 

 

1

 

construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and informational text through grade-appropriate listening, reading, and viewing

 

 

8

 

determine the meaning of words and phrases in oral presentations and literary and informational text

Productive modalities: The mode places the learner as speaker and writer for a ‘distant’ audience, one with whom interaction is not possible or limited. The communication is set for a specified audience, has purpose, and generally abides by rules of genre or style. It is a planned or formalized speech act or written document, and the learner has an opportunity to draft, get feedback, and revise, before publication or broadcast. (Phillips, 2008, p. 96)

 

 

 

Speaking and Writing

 

3

speak and write about grade-appropriate complex literary and informational texts and topics

 

4

 

construct grade-appropriate oral and written claims and support them with reasoning and evidence

 

7

adapt language choices to purpose, task, and audience when speaking

and writing

 

 

Interactive modalities: Collaborative use of receptive and productive modalities. This mode refers to the learner as a speaker/listener [and] reader/writer. It requires two-way interactive communication where negotiation of meaning may be observed. The exchange will provide evidence of awareness of the socio-cultural aspects of communication as language proficiency develops. (Phillips, 2008, p. 96)

 

Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing

 

 

2

 

participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of information, ideas, and analyses, responding to peer, audience, or reader comments and questions

 

5

 

conduct research and evaluate and communicate findings to answer questions or solve problems

 

6

 

analyze and critique the arguments of others orally and in writing

 

2 The terms receptive and productive language functions were used for the ELP standards schema, rather than the newer American Council of Foreign Language Teaching (ACTFL) terms used in Phillips

(2008), in keeping with the functional language terms used in the CCSSO (2012) ELPD Framework (which employs the earlier ACTFL terminology).

3 The ability to communicate via multiple modes of representation (e.g., non-verbal communication, oral, pictorial, graphic, textual) may be especially important for ELLs with certain types of

disabilities. When identifying the access supports and accommodations that should be considered for ELLs and ELLs with IEPs or 504 plans, it is particularly useful to consider ELL needs in relation to

broader receptive, productive, and interactive modalities when listening, speaking, reading, or writing are not the explicit focus of the construct(s) being instructed or assessed.

 

Individual Yearly ELL Outcome Plan (ELLOP)

      As part of the ELL program at Goddard USD 265, an Individual Yearly ELL Outcome Plan (ELLOP) for each student is developed that is based on the Kansas (Common Core) Standards for English Language Proficiency.  This plan lays out steps for ensuring the student is making progress throughout the year in attaining English proficiency.

     Below is a sample copy of the 2014-2015 ELL Outcome Plan. An individual student’s ELL Outcome Plan (ELLOP) is built around those 10 Kansas standards shown in different colors.  One or more standards have been chosen as the goal to be worked towards for each student based on information from their most recent Kansas Language Proficiency Assessment which is given each spring and measures progress in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  The numbers indicated beside the chosen standard are based on the level of proficiency that they are working to achieve for this current year.  The scores range from 1-5, with 1 being a beginning level and 5 being a fluent level. The plan also lists any accommodations or modifications that the student receives.   Each spring they will again be given the Kansas Language Proficiency Assessment to monitor progress made during the year. 

ELL Specialist Responsibilities

Marti Campbell

Sarah Hensley

Judi McAnally

Apollo Elementary

Explorer Elementary

Oak Street Elementary

Challenger Intermediate School

Discovery Intermediate School

Eisenhower Middle School

Goddard Middle School

Eisenhower High School

Goddard High School

Academy / Lakeside 

Clark-Davidson Elementary

Amelia Earhart Elementary

 

 
For further information please contact one of our ELL specialists

 

Marti Campbell
mcampbell@goddardusd.com
316-794-4288
Judi McAnally
 jmcanally@goddardusd.com
316-794-4187

Sarah Hensley
 shensley@goddardusd.com
316-794-4188

 

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